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Following the Emergency Use Authorization of both the Pfizer and Moderna COVID-19 vaccines, the Iowa Department of Public Health (IDPH) is partnering with county public health departments to begin vaccinating Iowans. Both vaccines are currently being administered in Iowa to the Phase 1A priority populations of health care personnel and long-term care residents and staff. 

As more vaccines become available, Iowa’s Infectious Disease Advisory Council (IDAC), will review guidance issued by the CDC’s advisory group the Advisory Council on Immunization Practices (ACIP) to further prioritize populations to receive the vaccine in Iowa. IDAC is currently reviewing ACIP recommendations for Phase 1B and 1C priority populations. 

“Benton County health is working with facilities in our county to allocate vaccine doses to the Phase 1A priority populations. BentonCounty will continue to provide updates for other priority populations as we receive additional allocations of vaccine. While right now, the vaccine is being made available to the priority populations, it is anticipated that by mid-2021, there should be enough vaccine for anyone who wants to receive it,” said County Public Health Director Katie Cox.

Until vaccine is widely available to all, it is critical that Iowans continue to practice the mitigation measures that can slow the spread of the COVID-19 virus.

• Wearing a mask or face covering
• Practice social distancing with those outside your household
• Clean your hands frequently with soap and water
• Stay home if you feel sick 

For information and updates related to COVID-19, visit https://idph.iowa.gov/Emerging-Health-Issues/Novel-Coronavirus/Vaccine and follow IDPH on Facebook (@IowaDepartmentofPublicHealth) and Twitter (@IAPublicHealth). 

The COVID-19 vaccines currently in use do not contain either live or dead virus. You may develop “flu-like” symptoms such as tiredness, fevers or headaches after receiving one or both doses of the vaccine but these usually resolve within three days.




Right now, health care personnel, long-term care residents and staff are receiving the vaccine. As the supply increases, more populations will be prioritized to receive the vaccine. By mid-2021, there will be enough vaccines for anyone who wants to receive one. 


COVID-19 vaccines were tested in large clinical trials to ensure they meet safety standards. Many people were recruited to participate to see how the vaccines offer protection to people of different ages, races, and ethnicities, as well as those with different medical conditions.


Vaccines work with your immune system so your body will be ready to fight the virus if you are exposed. Other steps, like covering your mouth and nose with a mask and staying at least 6 feet away from others, help reduce your chance of being exposed to the virus or spreading it.


V-SAFE is a new smartphone-based, after vaccination health checker that will use text messaging and web surveys from CDC to check in with vaccine recipients for health problems following COVID-19 vaccination.


 



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